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10 Cities Near Las Vegas To Live in 2021

Las Vegas is easily one of the most popular places in the world for travelers. And for some, it’s where they want to live.

But living right in the heart of a tourist-filled city that’s always awake is not the vibe everyone is looking for. Rather than be around the city crowds 24/7, you can live near the hustle and bustle of Las Vegas without being directly in it.

Here are 10 cities near Las Vegas where you should live. All are within about 60 miles of downtown, which means you’ll be in the center of the action in less than an hour of driving.

North Las Vegas, NV.North Las Vegas, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 3.3 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,187 (up 33.73 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,287 (up 26.87 percent since last year)

North Las Vegas is just about as close to the action as you can get without being in the middle of it all the time. It’s a conveniently located city — you can quickly hop on the freeway and zip to other cities and Las Vegas areas in no time.

The city is evolving and expanding, meaning new businesses are moving in and updates are happening to common areas and neighborhoods.

It’s safer and a little quieter than the nearby areas, but you can still get to the Strip in less than 10 minutes.

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paradise nv, one of the best cities near las vegasparadise nv, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 5.9 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Paradise is perhaps the most lively place to live. It encompasses both the Strip, with incredible nightlife, entertainment and shops, as well as the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where a younger crowd is concentrated.

With that, it’s no surprise that there’s always something to do or see, whether you’re in the mood for a five-star meal, live performance or high-end shopping.

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Sunrise Manor, NV. Sunrise Manor, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 6.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Just east of Las Vegas, near the base of Sunrise Mountain, are the suburbs of Sunrise Manor. While there aren’t as many restaurants and opportunities to shop, there are many parks and outdoor activities since you’re so close to the mountains.

It’s mainly a residential area and there are many people living there, but because it’s a quieter area, it doesn’t feel crowded. You get a great sense of community without feeling overwhelmed by the hustle and bustle of a bigger city.

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Spring Valley, NV, one of the best cities near las vegasSpring Valley, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 10.2 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Spring Valley is the perfect combination of being close to the city, while still being somewhat far away — but not too far away. It’s not so far out that you feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere, but the suburban environment doesn’t feel like a busy, constantly running city.

While there isn’t much by way of shopping or restaurants in Spring Valley, you’ve still got the Strip nearby, so you can easily have your pick of big-city amenities, or Summerlin, where you can enjoy a quieter boutique experience in an affluent area.

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Summerlin, NV.Summerlin, NV.

Photo source: facebook.com/summerlinlv
  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 10.7 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Only 15 minutes from downtown, Summerlin is an affluent city that’s on the outer Eastern limit of Las Vegas. Here, it’s nothing but quiet living in the suburbs.

Although it isn’t a large, bustling city, Summerlin does have lots of shopping spots and unique restaurants, many of which are boutique clothing stores and one-of-a-kind, independent cafes.

Although it’s not the most affordable place to live, it’s one of the safest in the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

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Henderson, NV, one of the best cities near las vegasHenderson, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 14.1 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,370 (down 2.65 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,501 (down 5.01 percent since last year)

Henderson feels like it’s very much part of the greater Las Vegas area and is only about 20 minutes away from downtown. It’s a fairly safe area and has more of a suburban vibe, rather than that of a constantly busy city.

There’s easy access to shopping and dining. And, of course, there’s no shortage of entertainment nearby. Plus, residents in the area can get residential discounts on many Las Vegas shows and events.

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Enterprise, NV.Enterprise, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 15.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Although Enterprise is only 20 minutes away from the bright lights of Las Vegas, it feels like you’re in a completely different world. It’s like a desert oasis and gives residents a more calm, slow-paced way of life.

It’s near lots of outdoor recreation, such as hikes and biking trails that take you up into beautiful desert mountains.

And even though you aren’t actually in the big city, you can still catch a glimpse of the Las Vegas lights from the higher vantage points of Enterprise. It’s really the perfect mix of desert living with city perks.

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Boulder City, NV, one of the best cities near las vegasBoulder City, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 26.7 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Located between Las Vegas and Hoover Dam, Boulder City is small, but it’s got just about everything you need to enjoy life without having to leave town. But if you decide you want to get away, downtown Las Vegas is only 30 minutes away.

Some of the more unique attractions that you won’t quite find in the big city are golf courses with unobstructed views and a flight line to the top of Red Mountain, where you can get an aerial view of the desert landscape.

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Moapa Valley, NV. Moapa Valley, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 60.6 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

A tight-knit town that’s full of families with young children, Moapa Valley is a surprisingly fun place to live. You may not think that a town in the Nevada desert would be so lively, but the residents here have created a community that evolves around family entertainment.

It’s one of those places that everyone knows everyone and should you need help, all you need to do is ask and you’ll find plenty of people jumping at the opportunity. And because it’s such a family-centered community, it’s extremely safe and everyone looks out for each other.

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Pahrump, NV, one of the best cities near las vegasPahrump, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 63.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Pahrump was originally settled by ranchers and still carries a small-town western vibe in some parts. That being said, it’s a fully-functioning city with everything you need to live.

It’s the perfect location for anyone that wants to live near both Las Vegas and Los Angeles, as it’s right on the border of Nevada, near California.

One of its most popular events each year is its film festival, attracting locals and big-city dwellers alike that want to showcase their films, or that simply want to watch and enjoy their fellow neighbors’ artistic work.

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Make one of these cities near Las Vegas your next home

You’ve got the choice between big-city amenities, small-town living, the suburbs and everything in between — you only need to decide what you want! Then start looking for apartments near Las Vegas or houses to buy so you can start planning your move.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments in April 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

10 Things to Know About Living in Philadelphia

Wedged between New York and D.C., Philadelphia has long been one of America’s most overlooked and underrated cities. The Birthplace of America, Philly is the nation’s sixth-largest city and one of its top cultural, culinary, employment, sports, music and education destinations. It’s a fresh, cosmopolitan city, and living in Philadelphia means you have nearly anything you could imagine to do, eat, visit, see and cheer for.

Philadelphia is a unique and diverse city, much more than the Liberty Bell, cheesesteaks and Rocky. It’s an inviting, connected community compromised of nearly 100 distinct neighborhoods from the gleaming skyscrapers of Center City to the rowhouses of South Philly to the rolling estates of Chestnut Hill. Whether you’re packing up for your move to Philly or just considering a relocation to the City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection, there are many wonderful things you need to know about living in Philadelphia.

1. Philly has a great climate if you like having four seasons

No matter which season you enjoy frolicking in, Philly is the perfect climate to experience all four seasons. Philadelphia is a temperate Mid-Atlantic city with the best of all worlds, just 50 miles from the Jersey shore and 70 from the Pocono Mountains.

Summers in Philly can be hot and muggy at the peak of the season, with average highs just under 90 during July. Winters are cold but not bitterly, with daily temps during the holiday season straddling the freezing line. Rain can be expected a quarter-to-third of the days each month, with about 20 inches of snow each winter.

septa train philadelphia

2. Commuting is relatively easy by car or public transit

Philly commuting is convenient compared to most of its Northeast Corridor counterparts. The average one-way work travel time is just more than half an hour, with more than 20 percent using public transportation.

For automotive commuters, Philly’s transportation network couldn’t be simpler. Interstate 95 lines the eastern edge of the city, the I-76 Schuylkill Expressway divides West Philly from the rest of Philly and I-676 (Vine Street Expressway) and US Route 1 (Roosevelt Boulevard/Expressway) run east/west through the city. Broad Street, America’s longest straight boulevard, forms Philly’s north/south backbone.

SEPTA operates a convenient public transit system, which includes a number of commuting modes. This includes the Broad Street Line subway and Market-Frankford elevated train, which travels north/south and east/west, respectively, 131 bus lines and eight light rail and trolley routes.

3. You have to learn how to talk Philly to live here

Every city in America has its own dialect quirks, but Philly has a language all its own every newcomer must eventually absorb. From your first “yo,” you’ll quickly learn every jawn (which can literally mean any person, place or thing).

“Jeet?” is what you’ll be asked if someone wants to know if you’ve eaten yet. They may want to share a hoagie (don’t ever say “sub”), grab pasta with gravy (tomato sauce) or a cheesesteak “whiz wit” (covered in melted cheese and fried onions). Wash it down with some wooder (what comes out of the sink) or a lager (ask for that and you’ll get a Yuengling beer).

Where are you going to go? Maybe “down the shore” to the Jersey beaches, out to Delco (Delaware County) or to Center City (never call it “downtown”) on the El (the elevated train). That’s where yiz (plural “you”) are headed.

And everyone loves talking about the “Iggles” (or “the Birds,”) the championship football team.

4. Philly is the City of Museums

More than any city in America, history lies down every street, many of which the Founding Fathers once walked. Independence National Historical Park, the most historic square mile in the nation, includes important sites like Independence Hall, Liberty Bell, City Tavern, Christ Church, Franklin Court and more.

Nearby in Old City are the National Constitution Center, Museum of the American Revolution, Betsy Ross House, the first U.S. Mint, Elfreth’s Alley and National Museum of American Jewish History.

But Philly offers so much more, including world-class museums dedicated to art, culture, science and education. In the Parkway Museum District, must-visit attractions include the Philadelphia Museum of Art (and the Rocky steps), Franklin Institute Science Museum, Barnes Foundation and Rodin Museum.

Elsewhere around the city are amazing spots, including the Mummers Museum, Academy of Natural Sciences, Magic Gardens urban mosaic, Mütter Museum of medical oddities, Eastern State Penitentiary and even the Museum of Pizza Culture.

Philly cheesesteak

Photo courtesy of Michael Hochman

5. Philly cuisine is much more than cheesesteaks

Sure, everyone loves cheesesteaks and every Philadelphian has their favorite steak joint. But Philly also claims a slew of other iconic dishes.

Hoagies are a party staple, but many swear by the roast pork sandwich, with provolone and sautéed broccoli rabe, as the city’s signature sandwich. Philadelphians eat 12 times as many pretzels as the average American and you’ll find soft pretzels in the Philly figure-eight style on every corner.

Breakfasts wouldn’t be Philly without scrapple or pork roll, two pan-fried pork-based dishes. And dinner can include tomato pie (cheeseless rectangle pizza on focaccia served at room temperature), Old Bay-flavored crinkle-cut crab fries or snapper soup, which is exactly what you think it is.

For dessert, grab a “wooder ice” (kind of like Italian ice but not) or a Tastykake (more of a lifestyle than a snack food line).

And Philadelphia isn’t just for casual eats — some of America’s greatest restaurants live here. Israeli spot Zahav was named Best Restaurant in the country, and Pizzeria Beddia the Best Pizza in America. Other award-winning spots abound, including South Philly Barbacoa, vegetarian destination Vedge and 20 restaurants citywide from decorated chef Stephen Starr.

But all cross-sections of Philadelphians can agree on one thing — everyone loves Wawa, more of a culture than a convenience store, with more than 40 locations throughout the city.

6. Philly is the best music city on the East Coast

There would be no American music without Philadelphia. The city is home to one of the nation’s greatest music histories as the birthplace of Philadelphia soul, American Bandstand, Gamble & Huff and “Rock Around The Clock.” Artists hailing from Philly span the spectrum from Hall & Oates, Chubby Checker, Patty LaBelle, Boyz II Men and Will Smith to The Roots, Meek Mill, Diplo, Dr. Dog, War On Drugs, Kurt Vile, Dead Milkmen and Joan Jett.

Philly is also one of the best cities in America to see and hear live music, with a slew of iconic music venues of every size. Music pours nightly out of legendary clubs, such as Milkboy, Johnny Brenda’s, Boot & Saddle and Kung Fu Necktie, concert halls like The Fillmore, Union Transfer, Theater of Living Arts and Tower Theater and outdoor amphitheaters with stunning vistas BB&T Pavilion and Mann Center.

7. Philly is one of America’s great college towns

Philadelphia is one giant college town. There are more than 340,000 college students living in Philly spread across nearly two dozen four-year campuses. Thanks to college sports, Philly’s top five major universities (that make up the Big Five) are nationally known and include Temple, St. Joseph’s, La Salle, the University of Pennsylvania and Villanova (which actually sits outside the city).

University City in West Philly is home to Penn, as well as Drexel and the University of the Sciences. And scattered elsewhere around the city are historically-black Lincoln University, Chestnut Hill College, Thomas Jefferson University (on two campuses), Pierce College and Holy Family.

There are also a number of creative and performing arts schools in Philadelphia, including the University of the Arts, Art Institute of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and Curtis Institute of Music.

Phillies

Photo courtesy of Michael Hochman

8. Sports are life in Philly even if we like to boo

You may have heard. In Philadelphia, we love sports. Unlike cities like New York or L.A., Philly has just one team in each of the major sports, so every fan is on the same page. Except for college basketball where the city is divided among a half-dozen Division I programs.

Philadelphians bleed team colors and everyone from every walk of life pays attention. Often, the city’s collective mood is based on yesterday’s result. So, if you want to walk into nearly any conversation in Philly, be sure to know the Birds’ playoff chances or who your favorite Flyer is. But Philly fans don’t take lack of hustle or effort lightly, and a subpar performance will bring out the notorious boo-birds.

9. The cost of living in Philly is pretty good

As the sixth-largest city in the nation and keystone of the Northeast Corridor, you’d expect Philly to be expensive. Actually, it’s pretty average. The overall cost of living in Philadelphia (as of Q1 2020) is just 110 percent of the national composite. Compare that to its neighbors like New York (246 percent), D.C. (160 percent) and Boston (148 percent). In fact, Philadelphia’s cost of living is cheaper than many major cities like Denver, New Orleans, Miami, San Diego and Baltimore.

The same goes for housing, as well. Philadelphia is only 13 percent over the national index average for housing costs, much more affordable than other East Coast cities and metropolises around the country like Phoenix, Dallas and Portland. For renters, an average Philly one-bedroom leases for just $2,127 a month (compared to the national average of $1,621), just a pleasantly-surprising 17th most-expensive in the nation, cheaper than Sacramento, Boston, Seattle or Oakland.

10. Philadelphia is one of the great American cities

Philadelphia is a beautiful, friendly, progressive city for anyone moving here or just thinking about it. It’s a hub for technology and finance and home to a dozen Fortune 500 corporations.

It’s a retail center with high-end city malls, vintage and boutique shopping corridors and Jewelers’ Row, the oldest diamond district in the nation. It’s a haven for those seeking outdoor adventure, including massive Wissahickon Valley and Fairmount Parks. And a destination for family fun at spots like the Please Touch Museum and America’s oldest zoo. It’s even one of America’s most walkable cities.

Living in Philadelphia

Philly is a great place for lovers of music, beer, history, shopping, sports, theater, coffee, biking, art, dining and more. Whatever your passion, you’ll find it living in Philadelphia.

And with a head start on what’s listed here, you’ll be welcomed with open arms and find out quickly why we’re known as The City that Loves You Back.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments. Data was pulled in October 2020 and goes back for one year. We use a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
Population and income numbers are from the U.S. Census Bureau. Cost of living data comes from the Council for Community and Economic Research.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.
Header image courtesy of Michael Hochman.

The post 10 Things to Know About Living in Philadelphia appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Mint Money Audit: Managing Money When You Make Enough

Anna’s email requesting help with her finances began with a unique confession.

“Farnoosh, my money problem garners little sympathy,” the 32-year-old wrote. “My issue is that I make too much of it.”

Now, THIS is interesting, I thought. I immediately followed up with many questions.

Here’s what I learned through our conversation:

The Denver-based Mint user earns $220,000 per year as an engineer. Anna’s also benefited from years of big bonuses and her net worth, not including her home equity, is close to a million dollars.

After paying taxes and health benefits and maxing out her 401(k), Anna takes home between $8,000 and $10,000 each month. Her expenses mainly consist of a $1,200 mortgage payment, car insurance, gas, food and utilities, amounting to maybe a few thousand dollars per month.

The rest either goes into savings where she stashes about $5,000 to $10,000 for unexpected expenses or into a brokerage account where she has roughly $800,000 invested. A wealth management firm manages that portfolio and charges, she says, an annual 1% fee.

Anna has no consumer debt, besides her mortgage, which amounts to about $338,000. It’s a 30-year fixed rate loan with a 2.85% interest rate. The home has appreciated in recent years with about $100,000 in equity (including Anna’s initial 20% down payment).

So, what is the problem, exactly?

“My big worry is that I don’t have the habits to manage money well,” Anna told me. Her sizeable bank balance has her feeling financially free, although she worries about getting carried away with spending sometimes.

“When I see money in my bank account I rationalize that ‘yea, that vacation is doable. I don’t hold back on the things that may seem frivolous,’” she says. But It seems she wants more financial grounding and to be able to evaluate expenditures and price tags more critically.

Anna’s situation may be unique, but I think relatable in the sense that we all would like to feel more thoughtful with how we spend, save and invest. And while some may do well with earning money, it should not be assumed that they can also manage that money well.

I applaud Anna for wanting to be sure that, even with an impressive net worth, she is actually making wise financial decisions.

Here’s my advice.

Take a Deep Breath

No need to panic when spending on things and experiences that you enjoy. From what I can tell Anna’s prioritizing the serious financial stuff first like contributing the max to her 401(k) and saving all of her annual bonuses in a brokerage account. She has no credit card debt and pays all her bills on time. That’s terrific.

Sometimes we just want to hear that we’re on the right track with our money and I have a very simple way to measure this:

If you manage each paycheck by saving, investing and paying all your bills first, then by all means, you’re entitled to have fun with whatever is left without any fear or regret. Am I right?

If you’ve done the good work of taking care of your future with your money, then don’t hesitate treating yourself and others with the remaining funds today. Splurge away and enjoy your hard-earned money. And remember to enjoy the moment.

Ditch Your Money Managers

I do think Anna could find a better home for her investments.

Paying one percent of her managed assets to this firm may not seem that high of an annual fee. But when you think about Anna’s balance of $800,000, that’s $8,000 this year. What about next year and the decades after that as she contributes more to the account? That fee, compounded over the next 30 years, will amount to – conservatively – over one million dollars. Ouch.

That doesn’t even factor in the expense ratios for each mutual fund that’s in her portfolio.

If all Anna seeks is investment assistance, she may be better suited stationing her money with an automated wealth platform or robo-advisor where her money is largely invested in low-fee index funds or exchange-traded funds (ETF) and the portfolio management fee is typically 0.50% or less.

Of course, breaking up with your financial advisor is not always so simple. It’s especially hard for Anna, as she equated her money managers to “father figures.”

If I were Anna, I would just explain to my advisors over email something like, “I want be more conservative with my money and that includes being extra mindful of the various fees that I’m paying. To that end, I’ve decided to manage my money more independently. I’m sure you can understand. I appreciate your help over the years. Please let me know next steps.”

Planners know the drill and are used to having clients end relationships.  Stay strong. Nobody can really argue with the fact that saving money is a good thing!

Establish Short and Long Term Goals

Anna wants to spend and save with more conviction. I think having some concrete, tangible goals can help.

For example, she shared that she’d like to get married, have a family and own two homes – one near her office downtown and another in the mountains as a getaway.

So, the next step is to understand what these goals cost. What are, say, the going prices on a vacation home in her state? How much might she want to stash in a separate account for the future down payment on this property? Knowing the underlying costs of her goals can better direct how much to spend elsewhere.

Next time she’s planning a vacation, she may be more inclined to price compare or hunt down better deals, as opposed to just judge whether the trip is financially “doable” by the amount of money in her bank account. Now she’ll have the image of that second home and its costs and will make a more informed choice.

Contribute to a Cause

Last but not least, when you feel you make more than enough, like Anna does, this is a great opportunity to be extra charitable. If she’s seeking a way to give her money more meaning and feel purposeful in her financial life, this is a truly wonderful way to go about it. Discover a cause that you’re passionate about and make an impact as a volunteer and donor.

Have a question for Farnoosh? You can submit your questions via Twitter @Farnoosh, Facebook or email at farnoosh@farnoosh.tv (please note “Mint Blog” in the subject line).

Farnoosh Torabi is America’s leading personal finance authority hooked on helping Americans live their richest, happiest lives. From her early days reporting for Money Magazine to now hosting a primetime series on CNBC and writing monthly for O, The Oprah Magazine, she’s become our favorite go-to money expert and friend.

The post Mint Money Audit: Managing Money When You Make Enough appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Does Renters Insurance Cover Storm Damage?

Your apartment comes with precautions like smoke and carbon dioxide detectors and alarm systems. But what about extreme weather events and natural disasters?

Your landlord’s insurance may only cover the building structure. But you’ve done your due diligence and signed up for renters insurance, insurance coverage that protects you and your belongings inside your rental.

But depending on the natural disaster, your policy could not be exhaustive enough and provide you with enough coverage. Sure, a tornado may be included, but not a big flood or landslide.

According to esurance, the average renter owns about $20,000 in personal property. That’s a lot of valuables, many of which are unable to be replaced.

Learn more about what kind of storm damage renters insurance covers — and what it doesn’t — and how to make sure you’re covered. If you’re not sure about your coverage, don’t hesitate to reach out to your insurance agent.

You’re covered for these

Most renters insurance policies cover damage from hail, lighting, windstorms, wildfires and the weight (think ceiling/roof) of ice, snow and sleet.

These perils, as they’re called by the insurance company, are often covered and you may receive a reimbursement to replace your damaged items.

If the wind breaks a window and your living room furniture gets ruined from the hurricane-force winds, you may be covered under your policy.

When speaking to your agent, depending on how bad the storm damage is, make sure that your policy covers alternative housing while repairs are ongoing. Your renters insurance may pay for you to stay at a hotel in the meantime.

You’re not covered for flood damage

Nearly 41 million Americans currently live in flood zones. But renters insurance does not cover flood damage, just water damage caused by appliances.

If there’s a high risk of floods in your area, consider an umbrella flood policy to protect yourself and your belongings. First, use the FEMA Flood Map to identify your area and its risk of flood.

If you need protection, the National Flood Insurance Program, a community program insurance policy, offers access to participating flood insurance providers. Before signing, ask how soon until the policy goes into effect — 30 days is the standard.

The flood policy will help you return your property to pre-flood conditions, according to FEMA.

flooding

Or earth movement

Half of U.S. residents are at risk for damage from an earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS). Most people think of California and the Pacific Northwest. But there are many spots around the country that exhibit earthquakes with enough magnitude to cause damage. Just last December, scientists recorded a 4.4 earthquake in Tennessee.

Earth movement doesn’t only include earthquakes, but also landslides and volcanic eruption. None of these events are included in your renters insurance coverage.

Depending on your home’s location, you may consider buying an additional policy for earthquake, landslide or earth movement protection. According to USAA, there are grants available in California to discount the price of earthquake insurance.

For landslides, an additional policy is required. It’s based on the property’s slope, house value, closeness to nearby mountains and hills and frequency of landslides. It’s expensive so be sure that your home needs it before pulling the trigger.

Choosing reimbursement

The main issue will be replacing your valuables after the storm damage. When looking for the best policy for you, talk to your agent about the benefit of replacement cost coverage vs. actual cash value coverage.

Depending on your items, one may be better than the other. Replacement reimbursement gives you the value amount for the item as if it was purchased today. The actual cash value is the depreciated value of it before the damage occurred.

How can your property manager help?

After the incident, follow up with your landlord or property manager to confirm the timeline of repairs. If the storm damaged the outside of the structure and deemed your home less than optimal for living, inquire about reimbursement for alternative living costs.

Inventory all damaged belongings once it’s safe to do so after the storm. Let your landlord know that you’re coordinating as well with your renter’s insurance. You’ll be glad that you have an up-to-date policy to help you get back on your feet during this scary time.

The post Does Renters Insurance Cover Storm Damage? appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

10 Hideous Cabin Decor Fails You Won’t Be Able To Erase From Your Memory

cabin decor failschandlerphoto/Getty Images

We love a cozy cabin in the woods as much as anyone—give us a crackling fireplace and warm mulled cider to sip, all day long. But if you’re lucky enough to have a home in ski country, there are a few things you should know about decorating it—because it is possible to take the mountain theme too far.

We get it, you’re serious about your schussing. But that doesn’t mean every bed needs a frame made from old skis, and all the dishes don’t need to be stamped with snowflakes and trees. And don’t get us started on dead animals mounted on the wall.

Need some help determining what’s rustic chic and what’s just plain old tacky? Maybe you simply want to scroll through some epic design fails to pass the time (who could blame you?)

Well, you’re in luck! We’ve done the heavy (ski) lifting to uncover the most atrocious cabin decor out there. Read on for the biggest no-nos.

1. Way too much taxidermy

Photo by Langford Construction Co., Inc 

We see where you’re going with this: Animals live in the woods—and you live in the woods too! So, therefore, it makes sense to hang up some furry friends to complete the equation.

Alas, these severed heads with super-sad eyes are just going to creep out your family and friends. Just say no (the elks will thank you).

2. Tree-trunk furniture

Photo by Amaron Folkestad GC Steamboats Builder 

We had to rub our eyes twice when we discovered that someone had installed a set of lift chairs in their breakfast nook. If you have kids and won’t mind when they try to sway their way through their bowls of Cheerios, then you do you.

5. Trail signs

Is there nothing new under the sun in a ski cabin?

Etsy

Crafty wooden signs that point you toward the guest room or loo have been done to death in most themed homes, from beach bungalows to modern farmhouses.

So of course, personalized posts are the next logical step. Watch out for those black-diamond directions—you could end up over your skis.

6. Corny ski sayings

Get it—going downhill? Groan.

Etsy

“Skiing is expensive (but it’s cheaper than therapy).”

“Caution: Trees don’t move.”

“Eat. Sleep. Ski. Repeat.”

Yup, we’ve heard and read them all. Try artwork instead. Blank walls work, too.

7. Bark anything

Papery birch bark isn’t attractive, people!

Amazon

Rough tree bark shouldn’t line your picture frames, mirrors, or any other home item. Ditto for birch candles. Some people may feel that these lights signal a home filled with hygge, but they’re a tad dirty and unappealing in real life.

8. Moose-print everything

This bedroom set oozes mountain vibes (and not in a good way).

Amazon

You’d better love moose if you’re gonna sleep in this bed. And when you add in the faux sticks, more antlers, and a looming head on the wall, you’ve hit the trifecta for mountain home decor fails.

This bedding seems cozy enough, and it could work in a ski cabin—just remove a few moose (meese?) first.

9. Trees for days

Beware: These bottle-brush pines are scratchy to the touch.

Etsy

Lined up on the mantel. On every single dresser. Oh, and check the towels, rugs, and throw pillows, too.

Everywhere you look, there are ski homes filled to bursting with trees in every shape and size. Are there no other motifs that signal mountain life? Asking for a friend.

10. Bear table

You can’t unsee this abomination.

BlackForest Decor

If you squint, you could imagine that this piece might be cute. But then you open your eyes, and realize that no amount of alcohol on that tree-trunk tabletop will make this kitschy bear seem like an appropriate home decor choice.

Sigh. If you must grab this item, relegate it to the kids’ playroom.

The post 10 Hideous Cabin Decor Fails You Won’t Be Able To Erase From Your Memory appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com