Category: Business & Office Guide

Best startup business credit cards

If you want to start a business, you’re going to need a business credit card. While many entrepreneurs fund the initial phases of their small business out of pocket, taking out a business credit card proves that you mean business – literally.

But which business credit card is right for your growing startup? We’ve got a list of the best startup business credit cards that meet a variety of business needs – whether you’re looking for a travel card to help make business trips a little more comfortable or a corporate card to issue to your new employees. We’ve also got tips on how to choose the best business card for your startup, how to increase your odds of getting accepted for a business credit card and how to make the most of your new card once you’ve got it.

Best credit cards for startups

  • No personal guarantee: Brex Corporate Card for Startups
  • Fair credit: Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business
  • Financing a startup: American Express Blue Business Cash™ Card
  • Cash back: Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business
  • Travel rewards: The Business Platinum Card® from American Express

Brex Corporate Card for Startups

Brex 30 Card

Our rating: 4.4 out of 5
Score required: Excellent
Type of card: Corporate travel
Spending categories: Rideshares, travel, restaurants, software subscriptions

Read full review

  • 8X points on rideshares, 5X on travel, 4X on restaurants, 3X on eligible Apple purchases and 3X on software subscriptions when you make daily card payments. Those rewards are 7X points on rideshares, 4X on travel, 3X on restaurants, 3X on Apple purchases and 2X on software subscriptions with 30-day card payments
  • 1 point per dollar on other purchases
  • 30,000 bonus points upon sign up and waived card fees for life (equal to $300+ value)
  • $5,000 credit for Amazon Web Services and 20% discount on annual Zoom subscription, along with other software discounts in your first year
  • $0 annual fee

Our take: With an application process that makes qualifying faster and easier than usual and a unique rewards program that offers up to 8X points on ride-sharing, the Brex Corporate Card is well-attuned to the needs of startup companies.

Why it’s the best startup business credit card with no personal guarantee

If your startup is at the point where you have a significant revenue stream and an office full of employees, you might be ready for a corporate card. Unlike your typical business credit card, which can be used by small business owners of any size (including solopreneurs and freelancers), corporate cards are designed to meet the needs of growing corporations.

In this case, that means no-cap rewards on four major spending categories – 8X Brex Rewards points on rideshares, 5X on travel, 4X on restaurants and 3X on software subscriptions depending on whether you make your card payments every 30 days or on a daily basis with Brex cash – as well as 1 point per dollar on all other purchases. Your startup will also be eligible for discounts on popular services, such as Amazon Web Services, Zoom and Dropbox, as well as a 30,000-point sign-up bonus.

Plus, it only takes a few minutes to get approved for the Brex Corporate Card. All you need to do is provide basic information about your business and link your corporate account. There’s no personal guarantee required, though you do need a minimum of $100,000 in your corporate bank account to be eligible for this card. The Brex Corporate Card has no annual fee and you’ll get five employee cards at no cost, but it’ll cost you $5 per month for each additional employee card beyond that.

As you use your Brex Corporate Card, your credit activity and payments will be reported to Experian and Dun & Bradstreet, both of which will help your business build its credit history.

Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business

Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business

Our rating: 2.6 out of 5
Score required: Fair to good
Type of card: Cash back
Spending categories: N/A

Read full review

  • 1% cash back on every purchase
  • Build business credit with responsible use
  • $0 annual fee

Our take: The Spark Classic card doesn’t offer the lowest APR or juiciest rewards; but it does help cardholders with damaged credit build a better credit score and earn a modest amount of cash back, so they can qualify for more generous cards over time.

Why it’s the best startup business credit card for fair credit

Your credit score shouldn’t hold you back from small business success – so don’t let your less-than-perfect credit prevent you from taking advantage of all the benefits a small business credit card can provide. Use the Capital One Spark Classic for Business credit card to help you build your business and your credit at the same time.

When you use the Spark Classic for Business, you’ll earn 1 percent cash back on every purchase. That’s a little lower than what you might earn with the top business credit cards, but if you practice responsible credit habits like making on-time payments and maintaining a low credit utilization ratio, your score should improve month-over-month – which means you might be eligible for an even better business credit card before you know it.

The Spark Classic for Business has no annual fee, which is one more reason why it’s a great card for people who want to get their business – and their credit – off the ground.

American Express Blue Business Cash™ Card

American Express Blue Business Cash™ Card

Our rating: 3.9 out of 5
Score required: Good to excellent
Type of card: Cash back
Spending categories: N/A

Read full review

  • 2% cash back on up to $50,000 in purchases per calendar year
  • 1% cash back on all purchases after that
  • 0% introductory APR on new purchases for the first 12 months (13.24-19.24% variable thereafter)
  • Spend over your credit limit with no penalty (as long as you stay within the over-the-limit amount)
  • Apply for 30-, 60- or 90-day Working Capital terms after first 6 months of membership
  • $0 annual fee

Our take: The Blue Business Cash card is a great option for small business owners seeking to create cash flow for a new or expanding business, thanks to its flexible credit limit and working capital terms.

Why it’s the best startup business credit card for large purchases

Startups often come with startup costs – which means you’re going to want a credit card that rewards big spending. The American Express Blue Business Cash Card is one of the top business cash back cards on the market, offering 2 percent cash back on up to $50,000 in purchases per calendar year and 1 percent cash back on all additional purchases.

This isn’t the only reason why you’ll want to use the Blue Business Cash Card to help you finance your startup costs. You’ll also get access to a flexible credit limit, making it possible to fund extra purchases during those months when you really need to invest in your business. (Be aware that you’ll need to cover both your minimum payment and your above-limit spending at the end of your billing cycle.) Plus, once you’ve had your Blue Business Cash Card for six months, you’ll be able to apply for working capital terms, a feature in which Amex will pay your vendors up front, and you’ll pay off the costs in 30, 60 or 90 days.

Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business

Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business

Our rating: 4.1 out of 5
Score required: Good to excellent
Type of card: Cash back
Spending categories: N/A

Read full review

  • 2% cash back on every purchase
  • $500 cash back if you spend $4,500 in first 3 months
  • $95 annual fee (waived first year)

Our take: If you want a simple business credit card with a superb cash-back rate, you will love the Spark Cash card.

Why it’s the best startup business credit card for cash back

If you want to earn as much cash back on your purchases as possible, consider the Capital One Spark Cash for Business card. Like the Blue Business Cash Card, the Spark Cash for Business offers 2% cash back – but unlike the Blue Business Cash Card, those cash back rewards don’t end once you spend $50K in a calendar year. Instead, you get an unlimited 2% cash back on every purchase.

You also get a welcome bonus – if you spend $4,500 in your first three months as a cardholder, you’ll earn a one-time $500 cash bonus. Just think about how you could use that money to grow your business (or to pay off your credit card balance).

The Spark Cash for Business credit card does include a $95 annual fee, but it’s waived the first year – and don’t forget that business credit card fees are tax-deductible.

The Business Platinum Card® from American Express

The Business Platinum Card® from American Express

Our rating: 4.4 out of 5
Score required: Excellent
Type of card: Travel
Spending categories: Flights, hotels

Read full review

  • 5X points on flights and prepaid hotels on amextravel.com
  • 2X points on travel purchases on amextravel.com
  • 1 point per dollar on other purchases
  • 50% more points (1.5 points per dollar) on purchases of $5,000 or more (up to 1 million bonus points per year)
  • 85,000 points if you spend $15,000 in first 3 months
  • Get 35% points back on a designated airline each year (up to 500,000 bonus points per year) when you pay with points and book your flight on amextravel.com
  • $595 annual fee

Our take: The Business Platinum Card from American Express offers generous bonus points and great travel perks – including the best lounge access around – for frequent business travelers.

Why it’s the best startup business credit card for travel

If your startup requires you to spend a lot of time working out of hotel rooms, you’re going to want a credit card that rewards travel spending. The Business Platinum Card for American Express is ready to help get you where you need to go.

Earn 5X Membership Rewards points per dollar when you purchase flights and prepaid hotel rooms through amextravel.com, 2X points on additional travel purchases made through amextravel.com and 1 point per dollar on all other purchases – unless you make a purchase of $5,000 or more, at which point you’ll earn 1.5 points per dollar. You’ll also be able to access an incredible welcome bonus in your first three months of membership: 85,000 points after you spend $15,000 on qualifying purchases.

Want to maximize those Membership Rewards points after you’ve earned them? We’ve got a guide to help you get started, but here’s one tip: Use Membership Rewards Pay with Points to book a flight with your selected qualifying airline, and you can get 35 percent of your points back (for up to 500,000 bonus points per calendar year).

The Business Platinum credit card also gets you access to the American Express Global Lounge Collection, a year of complimentary Platinum Global Access from WeWork (for cardholders who enroll between Feb. 15 and Dec. 31, 2019) and a $200 airline fee credit, among other perks. Be prepared to pay a $595 annual fee for the privilege of using this card – but if you travel often enough, it’ll be more than worth it.

Compare top startup business credit cards

Rewards Annual fee
Brex 30 Card
  • 7X points on rideshares, 4x on travel, 3x on restaurants and 2x on software subscriptions
  • 1 point per dollar on other purchases
  • 30,000 bonus points upon sign up
$0
Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business
  • 1% cash back on every purchase
$0
American Express Blue Business Cash™ Card
  • 2% cash back on up to $50,000 in purchases per calendar year
  • 1% cash back on all purchases after that
$0
Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business
  • 2% cash back on every purchase
  • $500 cash back if you spend $4,500 in first 3 months
$95 (waived first year)
The Business Platinum Card® from American Express
  • 5X points on flights and prepaid hotels on amextravel.com
  • 2X points on travel purchases on amextravel.com
  • 1.5X points on eligible purchases over $5,000
  • 1 point per dollar on other purchases
  • 85,000 points if you spend $15,000 in first 3 months
$595

How to choose a business credit card

Ask these questions before choosing which business credit card might be best for your growing startup:

How will you use the card?

If you’re going to use your business credit card to finance a large purchase, look for a card with a long 0% introductory APR period. That way, you can maximize the time you have to pay off your purchase without paying anything extra in interest. 

If you’re just going to use it for day-to-day expenses, think about what those expenses are. Look for a card that will reward your everyday purchases – like travel, office supplies or utilities – at a boosted rate.

Lastly, think about who will be using the card. If you want your employees to be authorized users, look for a card that offers free employee cards or custom spending limits. 

What kind of rewards do you want?

Are you hoping to earn some cash back on your everyday purchases, or are you shooting for rewards-funded travel? If you’re searching for a travel rewards card, it’s important to consider additional perks and benefits, like rental car insurance and airport lounge access.

What is your credit score?

Your personal credit will probably be pulled when you apply for a business credit card. If your score isn’t great, apply for a card that’s within your range. Otherwise, it’s a good idea to work on building your credit before you apply. 

Getting a line of credit in your business’s name can also be useful if you’re going to take out a business loan in the near future. Your business has a credit score too, and a positive borrowing history can contribute to a good business credit score, giving you a lower interest rate when you apply for business loans. If that’s important to you, make sure that the card you’re applying for reports to at least one – or all three – of the dominant business credit bureaus. 

How to apply and get approved for a business credit card

Applying for a business credit card is a lot like applying for a personal credit card. You’ll need to provide basic personal information, such as your name, address and income. You’ll also need to provide basic business information, such as your business’s name, address and revenue. Once you’ve filled out the application, expect a hard pull on your credit as the credit card issuer determines whether you are eligible for the card.

If you want to increase your odds of getting approved, here are a few tips:

  • Check your credit score to learn where you stand. If you don’t already have access to your credit score, use a free service to learn whether your credit is fair, good, excellent or needs work – and then use that information to find credit cards designed for people with your credit score.
  • Build your personal credit score before applying for a business credit card. Lenders check your personal credit history before issuing business credit cards, so consider doing some basic maintenance on your credit score before applying. Disputing errors on your credit report, paying off revolving balances and requesting credit limit increases can all improve your score and make you eligible for more business credit cards.
  • Use our CardMatch service to quickly identify which credit cards might be right for you. There’s no impact on your credit score, and you might receive special offers and pre-qualified matches.

Pros and cons of using a credit card for your startup

There are a lot of advantages (as well as some disadvantages) to using a credit card to help fund your startup:

Pros

  • Credit card financing is easily obtainable if you already have good credit and credit cards in your name.
  • You can cover business expenses during periods of low cash flow or finance a large purchase that will help you attract more customers and grow your revenue.
  • You can also use earn rewards on everyday expenses or earn points that you can put towards business travel – both of which can save your business money in the long run.
  • With timely payments, you can use a business credit card to build a credit history for your new business.
  • You can use credit card purchase and travel protections to insure purchases for your business.
  • Many business cards offer valuable perks for small business owners, such as airport lounge access, discounts on business purchases or credits toward commonly purchased items.
  • Credit cards can make expense tracking easier – many cards allow you and your employees to upload and track your receipts from your mobile phone and to download your expenses to Quickbooks and other accounting software.
  • You can automate repeating purchases, such as software licenses.

Cons

  • For financing a business, a small business loan might offer lower interest rates than a business credit card.
  • Likewise, using crowdfunding to get seed money (and customer buy-in) before launching a new product might be a better option than putting all your expenses on credit.
  • If the card requires a personal guarantee, your business credit card could affect your personal credit score.
  • Credit cards have high interest rates. Unless your business card comes with a 0 percent offer for new purchases, it can be very expensive to carry a balance on it.
  • Credit cards can foster sloppy financial habits if you’re not disciplined about paying off your balance each month.
  • Overall, since they’re usually linked to your personal credit history and charge high interest, credit cards can be a very risky means of funding a startup.

See related: Should you fund your startup business with a credit card?

Final thoughts

Getting a business credit card is an important part of growing a small business. For many small business owners, it’s one of the first big steps in separating your personal finances from your business finances. When it’s time to apply for a business card for your startup, think about which problems you’d like your business credit card to solve – and then look for cards that provide the solution you’re looking for. Think of it like writing a job description and finding the candidate that’s the best fit.

As your startup continues to grow, start thinking beyond business credit cards. The next step might be a small business loan, a crowdfunding project or a group of investors. Business credit cards are excellent tools to help you cover day-to-day expenses while earning rewards, but they aren’t the only way to finance a startup – and you’ll know when it’s time to start exploring other options.

Source: creditcards.com

Perch unveils impressive credit building app

Perch is a new mobile app available for iOS that can improve your credit score by incorporating your rent history and recurring subscriptions such as streaming services.

Currently, Perch is only available through the Apple Store. There are some similar offerings out there, but I think this one is better. It’s completely free and it reports to more credit bureaus.

Read more from our credit card experts.

Ask Ted a question.

Rent

Typically, your rental payment history does not appear on your credit reports. That’s a shame, because rent is the largest monthly expense for many households. It would be great if paying your rent on time helped you build your credit score.

There are some existing services that facilitate reporting your rent to the credit bureaus, but they typically charge fees. They can also get complicated, since many require your landlord to respond to the tracking company each month or mandate that they receive your payments through their platform). With Perch, you provide your lease details and grant read-only access to your bank account via Plaid’s secure API. That allows Perch to verify your payment history – without bugging your landlord or forcing you to change your payment method.

Even better, Perch can retroactively add up to 24 months of rental payment history to your credit reports with all three major bureaus. This could jumpstart your credit score in a big way. The company tells me their average customer improves their credit score between 60 and 160 points. And many who were previously unscorable instantly land between 670 and 690 – placing them in the “good credit” category. That’s incredible!

See related: How to pay rent with a credit card

Subscriptions 

Perch also has a novel approach to monitoring subscriptions. Users notify the company which recurring subscriptions they want to include, and Perch provides them with a virtual debit card loaded up to that pre-approved amount. The user pays Netflix, Hulu, Spotify, Apple Music or another subscription service with that virtual card number. They then pay Perch back. Perch reports this virtual card payment activity as an additional tradeline on users’ credit reports (note that Perch currently reports subscriptions to Equifax and TransUnion; it plans to add Experian by July).

See related: I signed up for Experian Boost. This is what happened

I asked Perch founder and CEO Michael Broughton what happens if someone doesn’t pay them back – would that end up hurting their credit score? He said no. Perch really wants to help their users build credit, so it will not place a negative mark on a customer’s credit report in that situation – or even charge a late fee.

Instead, Perch relies on proactive measures such as cash flow underwriting and warnings if your account balance falls too low. If you don’t pay, they’ll eventually prevent you from making future purchases. Broughton explained that their liability is very limited because they pre-approve these virtual card purchases and the eligible subscription services tend to charge modest amounts. He assured me that no one can get away with buying $500 Nikes and skipping town.

About Perch

Broughton is a 21-year-old graduate of the University of Southern California. He was inspired to found Perch after he had difficulty securing a loan for a $10,000 tuition shortfall. One of seven children born into a military family, Broughton was the first member of his family to attend college. He’s now assisting others who wish to improve their financial lives. The company’s investors include heavy hitters such as Citi, Sequoia Capital, SoftBank and Y Combinator.

The market is huge. FICO reports that 79 million Americans have subprime credit and another 53 million can’t be scored because they lack a sufficient credit history. Broughton told me Perch’s initial sweet spot is 18-25 year-olds, but he also noted that many older adults could benefit, particularly immigrants and people rebuilding their credit after a misstep. He has big plans for expansion and believes Perch can benefit 100,000 people in 2021. The app formally launched in late January and is onboarding new customers in weekly batches.

See related: How to build credit

Broughton’s ultimate goal is to spread the gospel of financial literacy and credit building. He wants to help people obtain their first credit cards and other financial products. “We want to launch you into the credit world on a better foot,” he said. The way I see it, Perch is off to an excellent start.

Have a question about credit cards? E-mail me at ted.rossman@creditcards.com and I’d be happy to help.

Source: creditcards.com

You spent too much on the holidays. Now what?

Credit card debt can be really expensive. About half of Americans have it, and the average amount is $6,300, according to the Federal Reserve. The holiday season is especially expensive, and 2020 was no exception: spending grew by 8.3% over 2019.

If you overspent this holiday season, here are some strategies for tackling your debt.

Read more from our credit card experts.

Ask Ted a question.

Get a balance transfer card

Zero percent balance transfer credit cards are great, although they’ve gotten harder to obtain during the pandemic. If you have proof of sufficient income and a good credit score – at least 700, although 720 or 740 would make you a stronger applicant – you might still be able to qualify. The longest 0% promotion is 20 months on the U.S. Bank Visa Platinum Card. It has a 3% transfer fee (minimum $5), and after the promo, the regular APR ranges from 13.99 to 23.99%. The longest 0% promotion without a transfer fee is 12 months, offered by the Navy Federal Credit Union Platinum card (which has a regular APR of 5.99% to 18%) and the First Technology Federal Credit Union Platinum Mastercard (regular APR: 6.99% to 18%).

Take out a personal loan

Another popular debt payoff method is a personal loan. Someone with good credit might be able to get a rate as low as 5% or so. However, the terms vary widely. The average personal loan rate is close to 12%, according to our sister site Bankrate.com. Borrowers with lower credit scores can be charged 20% or more. The typical term is anywhere from one to five years.

Card companies have their own versions of these that don’t require additional underwriting – for example: American Express Pay It Plan It, Citi Flex Pay and My Chase Plan. Existing cardholders can designate purchases to be paid off in installments, giving them more predictability and a lower interest rate. These companies often prefer to call it a plan fee rather than interest, but it’s basically interest. The equivalent APR is generally something like 6 to 10% for a plan paid off within a year or so. Most of these card-related plans last anywhere from three months to a year, although sometimes you can stretch them out longer.

See related: Buy now, pay later with installment payment services

Enroll in nonprofit credit counseling

Another option is nonprofit credit counseling, which is generally much easier to qualify for. There are some great agencies like Money Management International and GreenPath that provide helpful advice, consolidate debt and negotiate lower rates with creditors. These debt management plans frequently last 2-5 years and carry interest rates in the 6 to 10% range. Nonprofit credit counseling is best suited for people who owe at least a few thousand dollars in unsecured debt (credit cards and medical debt, mostly).

Ask for a lower rate

You can also ask your current card issuer for a lower rate: 78% of cardholders who tried that strategy were successful in 2020. To improve your odds, come armed with competing offers that you received in the mail or saw online. It also helps if you’re a good customer who has been with them a while and pays on time.

Avoid the minimum payment trap

However you decide to pay off your debt, always pay as much as you reasonably can – even if that’s significantly higher than the minimum payment. Just $1,000 of holiday debt can really cost you if you’re only paying the minimum. If your credit card interest rate is 16.05% (the national average) and you’re paying a 3% minimum payment, it would take you just over 7 years to pay off the balance and you’d end up paying more than $500 in interest.

Review your budget

If you are struggling to find the money to pay more than the minimum, take a hard look at your income and expenses. Identify areas that you can cut back, particularly subscriptions you’re not using and large expenses. For instance, can you move to a cheaper apartment, drive a less expensive car or trim your dining budget without sacrificing too much happiness?

See related: How to create a budget and stick to it

Bottom line

People get into credit card debt for many different reasons. Contrary to popular belief, it’s usually not because you splurged on a vacation or holiday gifts. The most common explanations are emergencies (e.g., medical bills and car and home repairs) and day-to-day expenses, according to a March 2020 CreditCards.com survey.

That same survey found that 56% of Americans with credit card debt have been in the red for at least a year, including 25% who have been in debt for at least three years and 15% for at least five years. Carrying long-term credit card debt can cripple your finances, so follow these steps to pay it down as soon as possible.

Have a question about credit cards? E-mail me at ted.rossman@creditcards.com and I’d be happy to help.

Source: creditcards.com